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(no subject) [Mar. 2nd, 2005|05:20 pm]
engagedpedagogy
laurieneighbors
Hi there!

Since we had a few new people add this community, I wanted to give a quick note of explanation. This community was created for a class I taught for graduate students interested in engaged pedagogy, and so the community posts are locked up for the most part.

Still, if you are interested, we might move this across the road and take it up again. With that in mind, I've created pedagogy_redux. You have to "apply" for membership at this point -- but, if we get a few folks together, we can decide together if the community should be open or closed.

In any case, I'd love to get things moving again. I've got lots of things to say ... Do you?
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(no subject) [Jun. 10th, 2004|01:07 pm]
engagedpedagogy
jherman2
[mood |happyhappy]
[music |k.d. lang, "endless summer"]

Dear friends:

I am going to Longview next week to begin looking for a house, and I probably will meet with the department chair about the classes I will be teaching. My load will be three classes per quarter, all writing, from "developmental" (pre-college-level writing) on up. I received two email messages from college folks today, one from the head of the search committee and the other from the department chair, expressing how "delighted" and "excited" they were that I will be coming to work at Lower Columbia College. That feels really good and hopefully is a sign of a nice community there. I hope all your end-of-the-term work is coming along well.

I will keep in touch on the blog.

Joan
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revised again [Jun. 2nd, 2004|09:49 pm]
engagedpedagogy
windysea
[mood |productive]

This is a tweaked version of my statement - if you folks have any comments I would be happy to hear them (please feel free to get nit-picky!).

As a teacher, I have a unique opportunity to connect with my students and show them paths that will help them to be engaged in the process of learning. In the classroom and in the studio my goal is to facilitate an atmosphere of intellectual freedom and open dialogue in which we can explore different types of music. I say we because I feel that it is important for me to enter the learning process with them rather than simply to deliver information to them. To better engage in the learning process with my students it is my responsibility to maintain an active presence as a performer and to immerse myself in continued learning about music and the process of education. I believe each student has the ability to make and understand music, and that it is my role as a teacher to encourage their own natural creativity, give them tools that enhance their skills and guide them as they explore different contexts that promote a fuller understanding of music. I see the process of learning as extremely valuable and have found that confidence, critical thought, and active listening skills are some of the benefits gained from the study of music that cross over into other aspects of students’ lives.

Effective music instruction should go beyond the mechanics of making music. Since music is deeply rooted in the culture where it was created, it provides an ideal opportunity for historical and cultural exploration. In looking at the musical work as an expression of its time, students will gain a deeper understanding of history as well as broaden their world view. It is important to give students new ways of looking at a musical score or listening to a piece of music. Becoming familiar with music terminology and theory allows them to be more actively engaged with the musical work. This increased understanding, coupled with improved technical skills, leads to a greater sense of confidence and performance ability.

When working with students of all ages in either individual or classroom settings, I often engage them in dialogue about the music. I find that information about the composer, genre of music, culture, contemporary art, and historical setting all lead to an enhanced understanding of the work being studied. I often include listening examples from non-western music traditions as they provide a unique opportunity to gain understanding of other cultures. Since I believe that exposure to a wide range of styles is imperative in developing performance skill, I encourage students to attend live concerts whenever possible. In depth study of scores while listening to recordings provides familiarity with the repertoire and gives the student tangible examples of the application of theory. I frequently use ear training activities and ensemble work to foster a sense of community among students and to encourage them to listen to one another. To increase technical skills on the piano I assign my students a variety of repertoire, as well as technical exercises and sight reading. To build confidence and familiarity with performing I often have class groups play for each other, and my private students are required to attend weekly studio classes where they play for each other and receive performance coaching. I have found that using this type of flexible and inclusive teaching method fosters student growth on many different levels and allows for a multiplicity of learning styles.

I hope that as a teacher I can help students to find connections; connections between the music and it’s story and connections between the music and themselves. These connections will be different for each student I encounter, and I see value in the varying backgrounds and goals. I don’t want my students to leave their experience with a list of information and a standardized sound. Rather, I want them to leave with a heightened curiosity and awareness of music as well as an understanding of their own unique voice in relation to music.
link3 comments|post comment

fascinating stuff [Jun. 1st, 2004|10:20 pm]
engagedpedagogy
windysea
[mood |geeky]

Ok so this is my 4th try. . .

Would you believe this is my 3rd try to post this?!

Damn it!!!!!!!! I had this all typed out and the stinking blog just made it disappear! #@!%%#%%@!!

I am working on a term paper on medieval women and music and I came across these strong expressions of the ancient roots of patriarchy:

"The philosophy of gender polarity, articulated by Aristotle, is the source of the male/female binary opposition so familiar to medieval thinkers. According to Aristotle male/female could be juxtaposed with active/passive, form/matter, and perfection/imperfection. Furthermore, these oppositions are not perceived as equal and opposite but rather are in a hierarchical relationship. The female is understood to the the result of defective generation and is, as it were, a deformed male. Since she is imperfect, it is natural that man should rule over woman."

"The philosophy of gender unity attributed to Plato is somewhat more complex because it was not presented in a sustained and systematic discussion, and because his evaluation of gender tended to vary from work to work. In general, Plato believed that male and female are essentially the same and only accidentally different. The physical bodies of man and woman differ but they possess the same eternal souls. For Plato, bodily existence has the appearance of reality but it is in fact imperfect and transitory. Ultimately the body will pass away, leaving only the individual's true nature, the soul, which is neither male nor female. Consequently, Plato's body-soul dualism established that woman and man were of the same nature and that woman was just as capable as man of moral and intellectual perfection. Yet, this dualism also relegated the physical to a secondary status. Woman's body was believed weaker and she was more closely linked with the physical world through the process of giving birth. This, then, provided an explanation for woman's evident social inferiority. However, social and physical inferiority notwithstanding, according to Plato women and men were of essentially the same nature and equally capable of the highest wisdom, virtue, and moral perfection." (mind/body split; view of the soul/mind as pure and valuable, while body is corrupt and suspect)

Tertullian characterized women as "the devil's gateway."

"By the late thirteenth century, as a result of Thomas Aquinas's reconciliation of Aristotelian philosophy and Christian theology, women's inferiority and subordination became grounded firmly on both the theoretical and practical levels."

(Quotes taken from: "Power of the Weak: Studies on Medieval Women." Edited by Jennifer Carpenter and Sally-Beth MacLean. Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 1995. pgs. 3-5.)
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"my feelings are not up for debate" [May. 27th, 2004|04:47 pm]
engagedpedagogy
laurieneighbors
windysea said in a comment to another post that she was finding it useful to remind herself, "My feelings are not up for debate." It seems like a low time in the term for a lot of folks, and so it seemed like maybe a little Dr. Albert Ellis would be in order:

10 Irrational Ideas
1. You must -- yes, must -- have love or approval from all the people you find significant.

2. You must prove thoroughly competent, adequate, and achieving; or, a saner but still foolish variation, that you at least must have competence or talent in some important area.

3. When people act obnoxiously and unfairly, you should blame and damn them, and see them as bad, wicked, or rotten individuals.

4. You have to view things as awful, terrible, horrible, and catastrophic when you get terribly frustrated, treated unfairly, or rejected.

5. Emotional misery comes from external pressures and you have little ability to control or change your feelings.

6. If something seems dangerous or fearsome, you must preoccupy yourself and make yourself anxious about it.

7. You can more easily avoid facing many life difficulties and self-responsibilities than undertake more rewarding forms of self-discipline.

8. Your past remains all-important and because something once strongly influenced your life, it has to keep determining your feelings and behavior today.

9. People and things should turn out better than they do and you must view it as awful and horrible if you do not find good solutions to life's grim realities.

10. You can achieve maximum human happiness by inertia and inaction or by passively and uncommittedly "enjoying yourself."
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revised statement [May. 26th, 2004|07:45 pm]
engagedpedagogy
windysea
[mood |bitchybitchy]

As a teacher, I have a unique opportunity to connect with my students and show them paths that will help them to be engaged in the process of learning. In the classroom and in the studio my goal is to facilitate an atmosphere of intellectual freedom and open dialogue in which we are free to explore different types of music. I say we because I believe that it is important for me to enter the learning process with them rather than simply to deliver information to them. I believe each student has the ability to make and understand music, and that it is my role as a teacher to encourage their own natural creativity, give them tools that enhance their skills and guide them as they explore different contexts that promote a fuller understanding of music. I see the process of learning as extremely valuable and have found that confidence, critical thought, and active listening skills are some of the benefits they gain from their study of music that cross over into other aspects of their lives.

I believe that music instruction should go beyond the mechanics of making music. Since music is deeply rooted in the culture where it was created, it provides an ideal opportunity for historical and cultural exploration. In looking at the musical work as an expression of its time, students will gain a deeper understanding of history as well as broaden their world view. I think it is important to give students new ways of looking at a musical score or listening to a piece of music. Becoming familiar with music terminology and theory allows students to be more actively engaged with the musical work. This increased understanding, coupled with improved technical skills, leads to a greater sense of confidence and performance ability.

When working with students of all ages in either individual or a classroom settings, I often engage them in dialogue about the music. I find that information about the composer, genre of music, culture, contemporary art, and historical setting all lead to an enhanced understanding of the work being studied. I often include listening examples from non-western music traditions as they provide a unique opportunity to gain understanding of other cultures. Since I believe that exposure to a wide range of styles is imperative in developing performance skill, I encourage students to attend live concerts whenever possible. In depth study of scores while listening to recordings provides familiarity with the repertoire and gives the student tangible examples of the application of theory. I often include ear training activities and ensemble work to foster a sense of community among students and to encourage them to listen to one another. To increase technical skills on the piano I assign my students a variety of repertoire, as well as technical exercises and sight reading. To build confidence and familiarity with performing I often have class groups play for each other, and my private students are required to attend weekly studio classes where they play for each other and receive performance coaching.

I hope that as a teacher I can help students to find connections; connections between the music and it’s story and connections between the music and themselves. These connections will be different for each student I encounter, and I see value in the varying backgrounds and goals. I don’t want my students to leave their experience with a list of information and a standardized sound. Rather, I want them to leave with a heightened curiosity and awareness of music as well as an understanding of their own unique voice in relation to music.
link2 comments|post comment

(no subject) [May. 25th, 2004|04:54 pm]
engagedpedagogy
laurieneighbors
Student Activism, to remind you why education is cool.
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comments [May. 25th, 2004|09:13 am]
engagedpedagogy
windysea
[mood |bouncybouncy]

yins -
I have been commenting on your teaching statements, but I am posting the comments as responses underneath wherever the statement was originally posted.
Gayle
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(no subject) [May. 21st, 2004|08:57 am]
engagedpedagogy
laurieneighbors
I'm not kidding, yins. Someone needs to step up to the plate for facilitation today.

Sara took a turn.
Joan took a turn.
God knows I've had my turn.

???
link8 comments|post comment

(no subject) [May. 19th, 2004|07:30 pm]
engagedpedagogy
windysea
[mood |melancholymelancholy]

Things I have learned from:

Laurie - You have shown me that it is possible to build community in a classroom, and that everyone’s contribution is valuable as we consider different points of view. I am especially excited that you have taught me how the ideas we have discussed in class are applicable to my particular situation.

Liz - Your sparkle and pep have opened my eyes to how neat it is when a teacher brings her personality into the classroom and how wonderful it is to really love being involved in student learning. Also, some of your blogs have reminded me that the ideas we are discussing in class are all around us in daily life as well.

Sara - You have taught me the truth in the phrase “still waters run deeply,” and through observing your contributions I have been constantly reminded to challenge my assumptions about people and ideas. You have a special knack for digging out important gems from a wealth of information.

Victoria - As you have shared your experiences in the classroom and putting on conferences I have many times been reminded that as a teacher and as a student I need to constantly re-evaluate myself and my methods. You have really shown me that strength comes from soul searching and that it’s ok to be human even when we are in roles of responsibility.

Joan - Your experiences with job hunting have taught me the value of tenacity, and also that it is not just ok, but it is actually good to have strong emotions about teaching and educational experiences. You have also taught me the fine art of looking at a text critically while still finding lots of value in it.
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